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smallbale.jpg (10517 bytes)Hay 4 Salesmallbale.jpg (10517 bytes)

We have located some excellent suppliers in the Northeast for timothy, alfalfa, orchard grass, and various blends.  This is high quality horse hay that we feed to our own horses.  It's especially good for broodmares and growing young stock, or any horse you want to feed nutritious hay. 

We offer competitive rates, superior customer service, and we can meet your hay needs whether large or small.  We can arrange delivery of a semi-load or an order as small as 50 bales or you can pick up the hay yourself.

Email us to see what is currently available, for rates and to discuss details.  Your horses will be glad you did!


Nutritional Analysis*
Hay Type Dry Matter

Crude Protein

Crude Fiber

Undigestible Fiber (ADF)

Calcium Phos.

Alfalfa 
(early bloom)

90% 18% 29% 35% 1.41% .24%

Timothy
(early bloom)

88% 12% 32% 41% .58% .26%

Timothy 
(full bloom)

88% 8% 33% 44% .43% .20%

Orchard Grass

88% 11% 34% 41% .40% .35%

Oat hay

90% 13% 30% 39% .46% .26%

Rye Grass

92% 11% 33% 38% .45% .30%

Brome grass

89% 10% 35% 41% .33% .25%

Bermuda grass

91% 9%

30%

38% .47% .19%

Clover (red)

88% 15% 30% 42% 1.50% .25%

Meadow Hay

92% 7% 33% 44% .61% .18%

Prairie Grass

91% 7% 35% not avail .43% .18%

This table is to give a general comparison of different types of hay available across the country.  These are "typical" values compiled by the National Research Council, various commercial tables, and published data in research reports.  Every sampling of hay will vary slightly depending on the soil conditions, weather, and harvest and storage conditions.  These numbers are given only to give a standard comparative value.  Hay is a product of nature and is variable even from bale to bale in the same crop. 

*Nutritional values referenced from the 1999 Feed Industry Red Book

alfalfa.jpg (11308 bytes) Did You Know? Alfalfa Hay is believed to have originated in southwestern Asia. Historical accounts indicate that it was first cultivated in Persia.  From there it was taken to Greece in the 5th century BC and to Spain in the 8th century AD. Spaniards introduced alfalfa to North and South America.  Its extension over the irrigated sections of the western United States began in 1854, when it was taken to San Francisco from Chile.

source: Encarta

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